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Heading Back to the Office? How to Ask Management to Bring Your Dog with You

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Dogs make people smile, they radiate a positive energy, and they make every moment more enjoyable. This is a great reason to wear your cute and comfortable dog socks to work every day — but what about to bring your cute and cuddly dog itself into work with you every day?

Boasting many wellness and productivity benefits, allowing employees to bring their pets into work with them has become an increasingly popular decision. Before you start packing your dog up for the office, though, it’s important to honestly review whether or not your pet is right for the office environment, whether your office environment is right for pets, and how to take it all from “right” to “perfect”.

Questions to ask yourself

Is your workplace appropriate for pets? Maybe your dog is sensitive to noises and barks every time the elevator dings, maybe your big dog is actually a scardey-cat and cowers in fear because of high public or client traffic, or maybe your dog isn’t suited to the sterile or focused environment. An unsuitable or unstable environment will guarantee a dog who’s going to react loudly, fearfully, or in a distracting manner, which is bad for everyone — including your dog.

Will you be able to do your work? Maybe your fur baby is uncomfortable, or maybe she’s just too darn cute — either way, there’s a good chance that you can’t take your eyes off of her. Don’t feel bad if you need your own space to work with no distraction, no matter how good of a distraction your dog may be.Will your dog adjust? Maybe your dog is super territorial, maybe she would prefer to sleep on the couch at home all day long rather than be stressed in the middle of the office’s energy, or maybe she doesn’t adapt well to change and unpredictability. There will be issues to work through with your pet to get them comfortable with being in the office just like you’ve done at home — but there will be some issues that your dog just won’t be able to adjust to here.

The approach to approaching 

  1. Talk to your co-workers

Whether it be due to allergies, fears, or behavioral and training concerns, your coworkers may have reservations about you bringing your dog into the workplace, and you’ll have to be sensitive to your coworkers’ reservations and consider if there may be a way to resolve their concerns. Also important is finding out how many employees may be equally interested in bringing their dogs to work with them — if you can display that many of your coworkers are in the same boat and want to bring their pets into work with them, your boss and any coworkers with reservations may be more likely to consider the idea.

  1. Hande dog-proofing the office

Your boss is already responsible for you and your coworkers, daily tasks, overall operations, and much more — and they don’t want to be responsible for your dogs, too. Make sure that you are carrying the weight of this project by preparing and dog-proofing your office so that they don’t have to think about it. Find areas outdoors suitable for walking dogs and letting them relieve themselves, identify all areas in the office that should be dog-free, and note areas where you may need to add features to accommodate pets such as animal waste disposal bins.

  1. Think it through (and show your work!)

Show management that you’ve thought this through and have it covered by establishing rules like: only home-trained pets allowed, no sick pets allowed, and strict scheduling for Pet Days. If you’re willing to establish an employee-led committee that can create and implement these policies and follow up on any complaints, management is much more likely to accept your idea with enthusiasm.

  1. Ask for a trial period

Consider asking to allow dogs in the office for a short trial period to demonstrate that pets in the workplace can have a significantly positive impact on your company, and to see how your rules and preparations work in practice. It’s important to make sure that everyone has a fair chance to make adjustments and become comfortable, but you will need to draw the line somewhere if it isn’t working out.

  1. Get it in writing

For your coworkers’, your company’s, and your own legal and physical safety, implementing mandatory liability forms and having a formal policy in place that establishes clear responsibility for any damage or injury that occurs as a result of their pet, for all participants, is always a good idea.

Etiquette to keep in mind

Help your dog adjust properly and work through issues. Before bringing your dog into the office, consider finding items like cute dog toys meant especially for the office and a bed that will make her feel comfortable and mark her spot here. Along with this, consider letting your dog smell and sleep with these items for a while before you take them to the office. Bringing your dog into the office in the morning (or the most low-energy time of day), and then taking her back home at lunch, is also a good way to start this endeavor off on the right foot.

Keep your dog clean and healthy Always remember that your dog’s ability to adjust, hang around peacefully, and remain happy will rely on them being healthy. This means plenty of quality exercise and playtime, keeping a healthy diet, and making regular trips to the vet. When you’re at the vet, it’s essential that you keep your dog up to date on all vaccinations and flea and tick treatments as well. Washing your dog, their bed, and their toys frequently, as well as addressing any outstanding hygiene issues as quickly as possible, will only serve to help you in this area.

Inform potential hires By letting candidates know (or incorporating it into your planning so that whoever is in the position to do so will let them know) about your pet policies well in advance of their time of hiring, you can be proactive in preventing future issues between people and pet officemates.

Heading back to the pawfice

By asking yourself the right questions, identifying concerns and accompanying solutions, taking over certain responsibilities, and staying vigilant when it comes to your pet owner etiquette — getting your dog into the office and making sure they don’t overstay their welcome can be as easy as asking!

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Raw Feeding Guide: How Much Raw Food to Feed Your Pet

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Raw feeding has become an increasingly popular trend among pet owners, as this approach to a pet’s diet is typically unproblematic to their digestive systems and can result in improved digestion, better dental health, and a shinier coat. Raw food mimics the natural prey diet a cat or dog would have eaten in the wild before domestication. Given its popularity, it’s no surprise that the raw pet food market is expected to reach over $195 billion by 2029.

Although raw food is a top choice for many pet owners, it can be challenging for some families to determine how much raw food to feed their pets. If this is your first time incorporating raw food into your pet’s meals, use this guideline to determine how much raw food you should feed your furry friend.

How Much Raw Food to Feed a Dog?

It’s important to note that the amount of food a pet needs depends on several factors, including age, breed, activity level, and overall health. 

According to Bold by Nature – a raw food company committed to providing pets with recipes that allow pets to thrive and remain healthy, it’s important to watch your dog’s body weight and consider your dog’s life stage and the season when determining the ideal feeding amount. You can use various resources offered on BoldByNature.com to better understand how much raw food to feed your pets. 

Adult dogs should generally be fed about two to three percent of their body weight per day. Overweight or senior dogs need about two percent of their ideal weight, while underweight or active dogs can benefit from consuming closer to three percent.

The guideline for feeding puppies varies on their age. For example, a puppy younger than three months needs to eat about eight percent of its current weight, and as they age, you can gradually adjust the quantity every few months. 

The key to feeding your dog the right amount of dog food is closely monitoring its body weight and adjusting the food as needed. Each dog has unique needs, so you may need to consider several factors before determining the ideal serving. You may also need to adjust your dog’s raw food serving based on their health. For example, if you want your dog to lose weight, it may need a little less food than a dog who needs to maintain weight. 

How Much Raw Food to Feed a Cat?

You can take a similar approach when feeding raw food to your cats. If you want to take the cold turkey approach, introduce the raw food to your kitten or cat without worry. But if you want to slowly transition their meals, start by mixing raw food with their canned food and gradually increase the raw food until they are consuming 100 percent raw recipes.

Like dogs, a general rule of thumb is to feed cats approximately two percent of their body weight. According to Cats Exclusive Veterinary Center, “a healthy 10-pound cat should have roughly 3 oz of raw food at each meal.”

Raw feeding can be a great way to provide your pet with recipes unproblematic to their digestive systems, allowing them to thrive in their daily lives while enjoying their food. When determining how much raw food to feed your pet, it is important to consider their age, breed, activity level, overall health, and daily calorie requirements. By following these guidelines, you can ensure your pet gets the right amount of food to maintain their health and vitality.

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Boxer Breed and Pet Insurance: Safeguarding a Lively and Playful Companion

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The Boxer breed is cherished by many for its striking appearance and lively personality. Boxers are energetic, friendly, and playful dogs that form strong bonds with their families. However, like any other breed, Boxers can experience health issues throughout their lives. To ensure their well-being and mitigate potential financial burdens, pet insurance can be an essential safeguard. In this article, we will delve into the world of Boxers, explore their unique qualities, discuss common health concerns, and shed light on the importance of pet insurance for these lovable canines.

Introduction: The Boxer Breed’s Popularity and Personality

Boxers are one of the most popular breeds worldwide, admired for their distinctive physical features and affectionate nature. Known for their muscular build and strong jaws, Boxers have a distinctively chiseled head with a short muzzle and a playful, expressive face. Their friendly and exuberant temperament has earned them a reputation as a wonderful companion and a beloved family pet.

Understanding the Boxer Breed: Physical Traits and Temperament

Distinctive Physical Features

The Boxer breed showcases a unique combination of physical attributes that make them instantly recognizable. With their well-muscled bodies, powerful limbs, and a sleek, short coat, Boxers possess an athletic appearance that exudes strength and agility. Their signature head shape, defined by a strong jawline, broad forehead, and soulful eyes, adds to their charm.

Energetic and Playful Nature

Boxers are known for their boundless energy and playful demeanor. They thrive on activity and require regular exercise to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Their playful nature makes them great companions for families and individuals who enjoy an active lifestyle. Whether it’s a game of fetch, a long walk, or a run in the park, Boxers are always up for some fun.

Intelligence and Trainability

Apart from their physical attributes, Boxers are highly intelligent and trainable dogs. They have a natural curiosity and eagerness to please their owners, making them quick learners. With consistent and positive reinforcement-based training, Boxers can excel in obedience, agility, and even therapy work. Their intelligence, combined with their loyalty and protective instincts, makes them excellent family pets.

Boxer as a Family Companion

Boxers are incredibly affectionate and form strong bonds with their families. They are known to be great with children, often displaying patience and gentleness. Boxers thrive on human companionship and are happiest when they are part of a loving and active household. Their innate protective nature also makes them excellent watchdogs, ensuring the safety and security of their loved ones.

Boxer Breed’s Health Concerns

Despite their overall robust health, Boxers are prone to certain health issues that owners should be aware of. Understanding these concerns is crucial for providing the best possible care for your furry friend.

Common Health Issues

Boxers are susceptible to certain health conditions, including:

  1. Boxer Cardiomyopathy: This is a heart condition that affects the breed, leading to an enlarged heart and potential heart failure.
  2. Hip Dysplasia: A genetic condition where the hip joint doesn’t develop correctly, leading to discomfort and mobility issues.
  3. Thyroid Disorders: Boxers may experience hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, affecting their metabolism and overall well-being.
  4. Cancer: Boxers have a higher risk of developing various types of cancer, including lymphoma and mast cell tumors.

Importance of Regular Vet Check-ups

Regular veterinary check-ups are vital for maintaining the health of your Boxer. Routine examinations help identify any potential health concerns early on, allowing for prompt intervention and treatment. Vaccinations, parasite prevention, and dental care are also essential aspects of routine veterinary care. By staying proactive and attentive to your Boxer’s health, you can provide them with a long and healthy life.

The Role of Pet Insurance in Safeguarding Boxers

Pet insurance serves as a valuable tool in protecting your Boxer’s health and your finances. It offers peace of mind by providing coverage for unexpected veterinary expenses. Pet insurance operates on the principle of reimbursing a portion of eligible veterinary costs, depending on the chosen plan’s coverage limits and deductibles.

What is Pet Insurance?

Pet insurance is a type of insurance policy that helps cover the costs of veterinary care for your furry companion. It functions similarly to health insurance for humans, providing financial assistance for medical treatments, surgeries, medications, and other necessary healthcare services. By paying a monthly or annual premium, pet owners can ensure their Boxers receive the care they need without facing excessive financial strain.

Coverage and Benefits

Pet insurance typically covers a wide range of veterinary services, including:

  1. Accidents and Injuries: Coverage for emergency treatments, surgeries, and hospitalization resulting from accidents or injuries.
  2. Illnesses: Coverage for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of various illnesses, including chronic conditions.
  3. Hereditary and Congenital Conditions: Some pet insurance plans provide coverage for hereditary and congenital conditions that may affect Boxers.
  4. Diagnostic Tests: Coverage for diagnostic procedures, such as blood tests, x-rays, ultrasounds, and laboratory fees.
  5. Medications: Reimbursement for prescribed medications and supplements essential for your Boxer’s health.
  6. Surgical Procedures: Coverage for both routine and specialized surgical procedures, including spaying, neutering, and orthopedic surgeries.
  7. Alternative Therapies: Some pet insurance plans may cover alternative therapies like acupuncture, chiropractic care, and physical therapy.

It’s important to review different insurance providers and their specific coverage details to find a plan that suits your Boxer’s needs.

Finding the Right Insurance Plan for Boxers

When selecting a pet insurance plan for your Boxer, consider the following factors:

  1. Breed-Specific Considerations: Look for insurance plans that understand the specific needs and health concerns of Boxers.
  2. Coverage for Hereditary Conditions: Boxers are prone to certain hereditary conditions, so ensure that the insurance plan covers these conditions.
  3. Routine and Preventive Care Coverage: Some plans offer coverage for routine veterinary care, vaccinations, and preventive treatments.
  4. Deductibles, Premiums, and Claim Processes: Evaluate the deductibles, premiums, and claim processes of different insurance plans to find one that aligns with your budget and convenience.

By carefully assessing these factors, you can choose a pet insurance plan that provides comprehensive coverage for your Boxer’s health needs.

Tips for Maintaining Boxer Health and Reducing Insurance Costs

While pet insurance helps protect your Boxer’s health and finances, there are proactive steps you can take to maintain their well-being and potentially reduce insurance costs.

Balanced Diet and Regular Exercise

Providing a balanced and nutritious diet is essential for your Boxer’s overall health. Consult with your veterinarian to determine the appropriate diet for your Boxer’s age, weight, and specific needs. Additionally, ensure that your Boxer receives regular exercise to keep them physically fit and mentally stimulated. A well-exercised Boxer is less likely to develop behavior problems and obesity-related health issues.

Grooming and Dental Care

Regular grooming sessions not only keep your Boxer looking their best but also promote healthy skin and coat. Brushing their teeth regularly and providing appropriate dental care can help prevent dental diseases that may require costly treatments.

Training and Socialization

Investing time and effort in training and socializing your Boxer is crucial for their well-being and reducing the risk of behavioral problems. Enroll your Boxer in obedience classes or work with a professional trainer to ensure they learn good manners and respond to commands. Proper socialization with other dogs and people from a young age can help prevent aggression and anxiety.

Pet Wellness Programs and Discounts

Explore pet wellness programs offered by veterinary clinics or pet insurance providers. These programs often include preventive care services, such as vaccinations, annual check-ups, and parasite control, at discounted rates. By participating in such programs, you can stay proactive about your Boxer’s health and potentially save on routine veterinary expenses.

By following these tips, you can promote your Boxer’s health, reduce the likelihood of costly medical issues, and potentially lower your pet insurance costs in the long run.

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How Pharmaceuticals Treat Veterinary Illnesses

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When it comes to treating illnesses in animals, the use of pharmaceuticals is a common and effective way to ensure their well-being and health. Pharmaceuticals can be used to address a wide range of illnesses, from simple bacterial infections to complex conditions such as cancer or diabetes. In this article, we will explore how the most popular pharmaceuticals can be used to treat veterinary illnesses and the various advantages they offer. Keep reading to learn more.

Tulieve

Tulieve (Tulathromycin) is an antibiotic used to treat a variety of bacterial infections in animals, including respiratory and skin infections. It belongs to a class of antibiotics called macrolides, which work by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. This prevents the bacteria from growing and multiplying, allowing the animal’s immune system to fight off the infection.

Tulathromycin is particularly effective in treating respiratory infections in cattle and swine, such as bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and swine respiratory disease (SRD). It has a long half-life, which means it remains active in the animal’s body for an extended period of time, allowing for a single dose to provide sustained therapeutic levels of the drug. This makes it a convenient and effective option for veterinarians and animal owners alike.

Rimadyl

Rimadyl is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used to treat pain and inflammation in dogs. It is primarily used to treat osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that causes pain and stiffness in dogs. Rimadyl works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are chemicals in the body that contribute to pain and inflammation. By reducing inflammation, Rimadyl can help alleviate pain and improve mobility in dogs with osteoarthritis.

In addition to osteoarthritis, Rimadyl may also be used to treat other conditions that cause pain and inflammation in dogs, such as postoperative pain, soft tissue injuries, and dental procedures. However, it’s important to note that Rimadyl can have side effects, such as gastrointestinal upset, liver and kidney damage, and bleeding disorders.

Clavamox

Clavamox is a veterinary antibiotic medication that is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections in dogs and cats. It is a combination of two active ingredients: amoxicillin, a penicillin-like antibiotic, and clavulanic acid, which helps prevent the antibiotic from being broken down by certain bacteria. Clavamox is effective against a wide range of bacterial infections, including skin infections, urinary tract infections, and respiratory infections.

Clavamox works by interfering with the ability of bacteria to form cell walls, which are necessary for their survival. This leads to the death of the bacteria, allowing the animal’s immune system to clear the infection. Clavamox is generally well-tolerated in dogs and cats, but as with any medication, it can cause side effects in some animals. Common side effects may include diarrhea, vomiting, and loss of appetite.

Heartgard

Heartgard is a medication used to prevent and treat heartworm disease in dogs. Heartworm disease is a serious illness that can lead to heart failure and death if left untreated. The medication contains the active ingredient ivermectin, which works by killing immature heartworm larvae before they can grow into adult worms. It is typically administered once a month in the form of a chewable tablet.

In addition to its effectiveness in preventing heartworm disease, Heartgard is also effective in treating other parasites in dogs, such as hookworms and roundworms. This medication provides a convenient and effective way to protect your dog’s health and prevent the spread of these dangerous parasites. If you suspect your dog may have heartworm disease or other parasitic infections, it is important to consult with your veterinarian to determine the best course of treatment, which may include medications such as Heartgard.

Overall, pharmaceuticals play a vital role in the treatment of veterinary illnesses, providing effective, safe, and affordable medicines to animals in need. With the help of pharmaceuticals, veterinarians are able to provide the best possible care for their patients, helping to improve the quality of life of animals and their owners.

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